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7 Night Diving Belize Barrier Reef From $2168

Turtle Inn - Placencia, Belize

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Explore a magnificent variety of coral and marine life along the Belize Barrier Reef. One of the world's greatest scuba destinations, Belize is one of the few dive spots on the planet that can boast the return of the largest fish in the ocean year after year. During the full moon weeks of May and June, the Whale Shark will glide through our waters giving divers and snorkelers the unmatched opportunity to share the ocean with them in close quarters. Package Includes:Welcome cocktails upon arrival Seven (7) nights in a luxurious Poolside Seaview Cottage based on double/twin occupancy. All cooked breakfasts and picnic lunches on dive days and five (5) dinners at one of Turtle Inn's restaurants. Five (5) 2-tank dives. Roundtrip transfers Placencia Airstrip to Turtle Inn.


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  • Currencies
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    1 Belizean Dollar = $2 US Dollar

  • Food
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    The Mare Restaurant - Fresh seafood and traditional Italian cooking come together at Turtle Inn's flagship restaurant. Local fish is brought in daily from the fertile reefs just offshore and fresh vegetables are delivered from our organic garden. Our changing daily menu offers such dishes as ceviche and gazpacho, fish cooked in a sea-salt crust and a selection of pizzas made to order in our wood-burning oven. The Mare offers a relaxed dining experience beneath the towering vaulted thatch roof, with incredible views out to sea. The Gaughin Grill - Our beachfront restaurant features fresh, charcoal-grilled seafood including lobster, jumbo shrimp and snapper all served on woven plates accompanied by a choice of Balinese-inspired sauces and spices. Tables are set just a few feet from the sea giving fantastic views of the offshore cayes and starry night sky. The sandy-floored bar and lounge also offers an excellent selection of Belize-brewed beer, wine and cocktails. Aunt Luba's Kitchen - Our own authentic Belizean diner, Auntie Luba’s overlooks the calm, shallow waters of Placencia Lagoon. The menu of our rustic-style restaurant is filled with regional fare like curry chicken, coconut shrimp and hearty beef stew, all served in a fun and friendly atmosphere. Belizean cuisine is an amalgamation of all ethnicities in the nation of Belize and their respectively wide variety of foods. Breakfast consists of bread, flour tortillas, or fry jacks that are often homemade. Fry jacks are eaten with various cheeses, refried beans, various forms of eggs or cereal, along with milk, coffee, or tea. Midday meals vary, from lighter foods such as rice and beans or beans and rice with or without coconut milk, tamales, panades, (fried maize shells with beans or fish) and meat pies, escabeche (onion soup), chirmole (soup), stew chicken and garnaches (fried tortillas with beans, cheese, and sauce) to various constituted dinners featuring some type of rice and beans, meat and salad or coleslaw. In the rural areas meals may be more simplified than in the cities; the Maya use recado, corn or maize for most of their meals, and the Garifuna are fond of seafood, cassava (particularly made into cassava bread or Ereba) and vegetables. The nation abounds with restaurants and fast food establishments selling fairly cheaply. Local fruits are quite common, but raw vegetables from the markets less so.

  • How To Get There
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    Flight to Belize City. You can then fly to Placencia or drive. We recommend a 4x4 car if you rent due to unpaved access roads to beaches and excursions around Placencia.

  • Language
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    English is the official language of Belize, a former British colony. Although only 4 percent of the population speaks it as their first language, a majority speak English very well. Spanish is also spoken widely as well as Kriol, an english based Creole language. Mayan languages and Garifuna are also spoken by a minority of Belizeans.

  • Nearest Major City
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    Belize City

  • Nightlife
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    Placencia has a variety of night spots and the locals seem to pick one night for each spot. This has changed through out the years so it's best to just ask "so where is everyone going to be tonight". Tipsy Tuna seems to hold the weekend crowd as well as one night a week Karaoke. Sugar Reef down by the lagoon is another good option.The Pickled Parrot sometimes has life music and the Cosy Corner is a nice place to relax with a Belikin, the local beer.Placencia is booming on Thursdays and Sundays with entertainment. Barefoot Grill and Bar has an active Saturday night with live reggae music out on a big deck. Other options are Martha's Rum Party, The Hangout, ChiChi's

  • Recommended Packing
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    For all trips: • Binoculars • Camera or video camera with case for protection against humidity and rain • Plenty of film • Sun block lotion • Sunglasses with a strap • Swimming trunks • Broad-brimmed hat or cap • Insect repellent • Personal toiletries and medications • Photocopy of your passport • Reading material If you are heading for the jungle do not leave without: • Lightweight, light colored, long cotton pants • Long sleeved, light colored cotton shirts • Absorbent socks • Ankle-high hiking boots • Sneakers • Sandals • A powerful flashlight with batteries • A water bottle or canteen • Rain suit or poncho

  • See + Do
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    SCUBA - The Caribbean's largest barrier reef lies just offshore from Turtle Inn, offering divers a magnificent diversity of coral and marine life to explore. In addition, a number of easily accessible cayes (tiny islands) have their own reefs and underwater ecosystems, cementing Belize's reputation as one of the world's great scuba destinations. Only a few dive destinations on the planet can boast about the return of the largest fish in the ocean year after year. During the full moon week of April, May and June, the whale shark will glide through our waters giving divers and snorkelers the unmatched opportunity to share the ocean with them in close quarters. At Gladden Spit whale sharks will readily approach boats, snorkelers and divers if they do not feel threatened. Clear, calm waters combined with an abundance of fascinating coral and fish make Placencia a premier spot for snorkeling. Located in the beautiful rainforest of the Toledo District in Southern Belize, an hour’s scenic drive from Turtle Inn leads you to the late-classic ceremonial site of Nim Li Punit. After a fascinating guided tour of the ruins and small but informative museum we’ll quickly drive to Indian Creek village. Lubaantun Maya Site and Rio Blanco Waterfalls Excavated Maya ruins looming above the subtropical jungle, Lubaantun (Place of the Falling Stones) is a spectacle to behold. With three plazas and rounded walls made in the distinctive Mayan style, you can enjoy a picnic lunch and then venture to Rio Blanco Waterfalls where water cascades 20 feet from a cliff into a large blue-green pool below, perfect for an afternoon swim. Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary The world’s only jaguar preserve is a superb place for birding, hiking and wildlife viewing. Hiking trails are well marked and range from easy to more challenging. Take a picnic lunch, float down the river in an inner tube and then cool off under refreshing waterfalls. Monkey River Wildlife Adventure Explore Monkey River by boat observing howler monkeys, tropical birds, iguanas, crocodiles and many other species of wildlife. Our experienced guide will take you through mangrove estuaries at the edge of the lagoon, home of the manatee, and we’ll hike trails through the rainforest to view families of howler monkeys. You can also plan a Sunset Cruise or take a bike ride around Placencia.

  • Time Zone
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    Belize is in Central Standard Time Zone UTC/GMT - 6

  • visa and legal info
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    All U.S. citizens must have a U.S. passport valid for at least six months from the date of arrival in Belize and proof of an onward or return ticket. No visas are required for citizens of the United States for tourist visits of up to 30 days, but they must have onward or return air tickets and proof of sufficient funds to maintain themselves in Belize. No specific immunizations are required for visitors to Belize.

  • Weather
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    Belize is typically hot and humid day and night year-round. Temperatures vary by only about 4°C between the coolest part of the year (December to March) and the hottest (May to September). The daily temperature range is around 10°C from the hottest part of the day to the coolest part of the night. In the uplands (Mountain Pine Ridge and the Maya Mountains) you can expect temperatures to fall by about 3°C for every 1000ft rise in altitude, making things noticeably more comfortable. Belize has distinct wet and dry seasons. The wet season runs from mid-May to November in the south and from mid-June to November in the north. November to February is a transitional period, with the year’s coolest temperatures and a limited amount of rain. The true dry season is February to April. In Belize the high season for tourists corresponds roughly with the dry season: December to May. The shoulder months – especially December – receive a fair amount of rain, but not enough to scare away the multitudes of travelers who want to spend their holidays in the tropics. Most hotels and resorts are more expensive during this period (high-season rates are quoted throughout this book). The biggest influx of tourists comes between December 15 and January 15, and during the weeks around Easter. Some hotels and resorts, especially top-end accommodations, charge extra-high prices during these peak periods. If you’re using top-end or some midrange accommodations, you’ll certainly save money by avoiding these seasons. The rainy season runs from June to November. The early months, especially May and June, are actually a wonderful time to travel to Belize: you can avoid the tourist bustle and lodging is slightly cheaper.

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